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UK using unemployment and phone bills against Scottish independence

Staff writer ▼ | July 3, 2013
There is almost year and a half until Scotland independence referendum in September 2014 but UK politicians are already creating pressure using arguments from unemployment, to EU membership, to phone bills.
Scotland independence
Scotland independenceThere is almost year and a half until Scotland independence referendum in September 2014 but UK politicians are already creating pressure using arguments from unemployment, to EU membership, to phone bills.


Britain's business secretary Vince Cable warned that Scotland's independence will create a fragile jobs market and and jeopardize economic growth.

If the 5 million nation votes for a split next year, "Breaking up Scotland's most lucrative market would destabilise enterprise and potentially put growth and jobs at risk," said Mr. said Cable.

However, the Scottish government answered immediately and said independence would end decades of economic mismanagement and the country would be aiming to keep a single market and a currency union with the rest of Britain.

The government said "independence would allow future Scottish Governments to require proper connectivity for rural areas, boost business growth and ensure a combined economic regulator that is both cheaper and more efficient than Westminster's bureaucracy."

UK Government wasn't sitting tight but warned that Scotland will have to apply to the European membership again because as an independent its membership in the European Union would cease to exist.

However, that was a weak argument since Scotland is already part of the European Union, receives union's agricultural funding and, in the case it was blocked from joining, it could deny access to Scottish waters to other EU nations. That would means that fishermen from all EU wouldn't be able to fish in Scottish waters and that would be very inconvenient for the EU since the fishing industry is one of the main industry field.

The third attempt to shake public opinion before independence referendum was an attempt by the United Kingdom government to persuade general public that mobile phone bills could rise under Scottish independence.

That claim has been called "silly" by Jackson Carlaw, deputy leader of the Scottish Conservatives. He made the comment shortly before the publication of a Coalition paper on communications which will warn that consumers may have to pay more if they use their phones south of the border.

Scottish politician pointed out that EU will cap the roaming charges which can drive up bills when phones are taken to other European countries. The price cap on downloading data while travelling in EU countries will be 36% cheaper, and 91% cheaper compared to 2007. "Some of the arguments against #indy are becoming a bit silly," Mr. Carlaw wrote on its Twitter profile.


 

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