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Mayor Johnson's new funding for social supermarkets

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Staff writer ▼ | May 15, 2015
Boris Johnson
London, UK   Reducing food poverty and waste

London boroughs can bid for a share of £300,000 to help create "social supermarkets" that make otherwise unwanted food available cheaply to those on very low incomes.

Announcement comes as Mayor’s award winning food waste scheme FOODSAVE helps save small businesses a record £550,000 and diverts over 1,000 tonnes of food waste from landfill.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, has announced £300,000 of funding for new social supermarkets that reduce food waste by selling stock at low prices to local people on low incomes and struggling with food poverty.

The food is in-date and wholesome and would otherwise be thrown away by big retailers for a variety of reasons, including items packaged and weighed incorrectly and over-production.

London boroughs can apply for a share of the fund to help set up pilot supermarkets which help families on lower incomes and offer a range of supportive community services.

The new shops will receive funding from the Mayor’s High Street Fund as part of a £129 million investment from the Mayor that has already improved 56 high streets across the capital and attracted £56 million of match funding from public and private sector partners, aimed specifically at helping London’s high streets to adapt and thrive.

The Mayor is helping tackle the problem of food waste and has already helped divert 1170 tonnes of unwanted food from landfill – the equivalent of 97 Routemaster buses – to his successful FoodSave scheme that has helped 200 small and medium sized food organisations prevent food waste and put surplus to good use.

Businesses have been busy turning their surplus food into meals and their food by-products into animal feed, making a collective saving of £582,437.

FoodSave traders in Borough Market have used the scheme to turn food surplus previously sent to landfill into 4,800 nourishing meals for hundreds of people living in the area.


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