RSS   Newsletter   Contact   Advertise with us

The Star of India

Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn
Edward Green ▼ | November 25, 2008
You hear that woman brings bad luck to ship, but you also saw many sail boats with a sculpture of a woman with naked breasts. What's the connection?
The Star of India
The Star of IndiaYou hear that woman brings bad luck to ship, but you also saw many sail boats with a sculpture of a woman with naked breasts. What's the connection?


In the glorious years of tall ships, as this is partially true even today, sailors were on blue sea for months. Thus, when they saw a nice woman on board they lost that quantum of sense they still had. So, the owners of the big ship came with the story that woman on the ship bring the bad luck, but since the man can't do without a woman the story has the other side: Only the naked woman's breast can calm down the stormy sea. That result: Sculptures with naked breasts on the front of the ships.

The Star of IndiaOne the finest old ships and the one that is still active is The Star of India. She began her life at Ramsey Shipyard in the Isle of Man in 1863. Five months after laying the keel, the ship was on maiden voyage. She was named Euterpe.

Euterpe was a full-rigged ship and remained so until 1901, when the Alaska Packers Association rigged her down to a barque, her present rig. Euterpe began her sailing life with two near-disastrous voyages to India. On her first trip she suffered a collision and a mutiny. On her second trip, a cyclone caught Euterpe in the Bay of Bengal, and her topmasts was destroyed.

After such a hard luck beginning, Euterpe settled down and made four more voyages to India as a cargo ship. In 1871 she was purchased by the Shaw Savill line of London and made 21 circumnavigations in this service. Euterpe was sold to American owners in 1898, and in 1923 she was laid up by her owners the Alaska Packers. The Packers had changed her name in 1906, dubbing her Star of India.

The Star of IndiaA group of San Diegans, led by reporter Jerry MacMullen, bought her 9,000 dollars in 1926, and the following year she was towed to San Diego. For the next three decades the Star of India languished. In 1976, the fully restored Star of India put to sea for the first time in fifty years, under the command of Captain Carl Bowman. She sailed beautifully that day, to the applause of half a million of her fans, ashore and afloat.

The Star of India now sails at least once a year making her the oldest active ship of any kind in the world. November 25, 2008


 

MORE INSIDE POST