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One high-tech job creates more than four non-high tech jobs

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High-tech jobsThe high-tech sector has remained stable during the financial crisis with 19% higher wages and an unemployment rate consistently below 4%, according to a study by the Belgian university KU Leuven (KUL).


The high technology business has grown two and a half times more than all other job sectors since 2000, says the study, High-technology employment in the European Union.

Professor Maarten Goos, one of the authors, said at a conference organised by the economic think tank Bruegel that it was key for EU governments and institutions to pursue job creation, invest in high-tech skills and share knowledge across European regions in that sector. The authors also stressed the importance of the “spillover effect” of high-tech jobs to other economic sectors.

The study defines high-tech jobs as "those involved in the production of high-tech goods and services or otherwise engaged in highly technical activities in other industries", including "those employed in science, technology, engineering and math (also known as STEM occupations) in non-high tech industries."

"We estimate that the creation of one high-tech job in a local economy creates more than four additional non-high tech jobs in the same region, this includes workers across the skill spectrum, such as lawyers, physicians, waiters, taxi drivers, schoolteachers..."

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