RSS   Newsletter   Contact   Advertise with us

Minnesota's health systems contributed more than $4.3 billion to communities

Staff writer ▼ | February 4, 2016
Minnesota's hospitals and health systems contributed more than $4.3 billion in programs and services in 2014 to benefit the health of their communities.
Minnesota hospital
Public health   The latest annual Community Benefit Report
Minnesota hospitals provided $402 million in proactive services.
This is an increase of 4.6 percent compared to 2013, according to the latest annual Community Benefit Report by the Minnesota Hospital Association (MHA).

$419
million in education and workforce development
Of the $4.3 billion, Minnesota hospitals provided $402 million in proactive services responding to specific community health needs, such as health screenings, health education, health fairs, immunization clinics and other community outreach, including in the areas of fitness, weight loss, mental health and diabetes prevention.

Minnesota hospitals provided $589 million in uncompensated care, or care provided without payment – an increase of 2.9 percent compared to 2013.

This uncompensated care includes "charity care" for patients from whom there is no expectation of payment and "bad debt," the result of patients who could not or did not pay their share of the hospital bill. The overall cost of charity care decreased in 2014 as more Minnesotans secured health insurance, a priority long supported by MHA.

The amount of bad debt increased, however, making uncompensated care a continuing concern for hospitals. The main driver of increasing bad debt is high-deductible health plan amounts owed by patients that go unpaid.

Other highlights:

$419 million in education and workforce development, including training for doctors, nurses and other highly skilled health care professionals

$235 million in research to support the development of better medical treatments and to find cures for diseases.

$2.3 billion in government underfunding as a result of treating Medicare and Medicaid patients and receiving government reimbursements that are less than the actual cost of providing the care – an increase of 10.9 percent compared to 2013.


 

MORE INSIDE POST