RSS   Newsletter   Contact   Advertise with us
Post Online Media
Post Online Media Magazine

Governance reform could see African economies benefit to tune of £23bn

Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn
Christian Fernsby |
Africa economy
Africa   The continent-wide economic analysis modelled the performance of each country

The latest edition of PwC’s bimonthly Global Economy Watch has found that African economies could receive a windfall of £23bn if each economy applied similar governance reforms equivalent to those made by Cote d’Ivoire since 2013.

The continent-wide economic analysis modelled the performance of each country across six of the World Bank’s Worldwide Governance Indicators (2013-17), which covers aspects such as regulatory quality, rule of law and government effectiveness.

The analysis has found that if each African economy made an improvement to governance equivalent to that made by Côte d’Ivoire over the past four years, these gains would be worth around $23bn if realised across the continent.

The countries with the largest potential gains are those with a comparatively high GDP per head but a poor track record on governance.

Accordingly, oil-rich Libya and Equatorial Guinea would see the greatest increase, with each person gaining an additional $400 and $200, respectively.

Those with lower GDP per capita, such as Niger and Malawi, would see a smaller improvement, despite their governance rank being below the average for the region.

By contrast, economies like Rwanda, which have made similar improvements to Côte d’Ivoire, would also only realise a small benefit, with greater gains made through further diversification of their economies.

The forecast also notes strong regional differences in economic growth across the continent.

Economic growth has been particularly strong in East Africa (at around 3% a year since 2013).

Central Africa, by contrast, saw annual real GDP per capita fall by an average of 1.3% over the period.

North Africa and the Southern region experienced very sluggish growth (of 0.4% and 0.8% a year respectively), while West Africa saw faster growth of 1.9% a year.


What to read next
POST Online Media Contact