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Australia can be powered on 100% green energy

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Australia green energy
WWF-Australia   The technology is Down Under

Australia can be powered on 100% renewables with the same levels of reliability, WWF-Australia says.


A new report by WWF-Australia that the concept of "baseload" power becomes redundant under a 100% renewable energy grid. Australia has the technology: current technology (including batteries) could allow us to keep the lights on 24/7 using only renewable energy.

Senior executives of major international energy companies in China, Germany and the UK acknowledge there will be no need for "baseload" power as we know it today.

Denmark, Portugal and most recently, Tasmania have relied on 100% renewable energy for full days.

“In Australia we are used to the idea of ‘baseload energy’ being the energy that ensures we can flick the lights on at any point in the night, but that’s old thinking,” said Adrian Enright, Climate Change Policy Manager at WWF-Australia.

“The problem is the bulk of our baseload energy comes from high polluting, ageing coal fired generators. Some of Australia’s existing baseload capacity was built before man first landed on the moon.

“To enjoy clean air and reduce carbon pollution Australia will need to shift to a modern, 21st Century model, powered by 100% renewable energy by 2035. This is possible, affordable and very popular.

“Utilising existing technology, Australia could keep the lights on 24/7 by harnessing huge volumes of renewable energy spread across Australia. Emerging battery storage can make this process smoother and cheaper.

“With key market reforms in place to manage the energy transition, Australians can comfortably let go of the mindset of ‘baseload’ and have confidence in a modern, reliable, renewable energy sector powering our future.”

In the lead up to the Federal Election, WWF-Australia is calling on all parties to commit to a transition to 100% renewable electricity by 2035.


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