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Russia to grant millions in aid to Magnitogorsk building collapse victims

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Magnitogorsk collapse
Russia   Magnitogorsk collapse

Russia announced aid of 147 million rubles (2.195.000 million dollars) to support housing acquisitions by those affected, after a building collapsed in the Siberian city of Magnitogorsk.

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev instructed Deputy Prime Minister Vitali Mutko to draw up a channeling program for this money, taken from the executive's reserve fund, to be handed over to more than 100 families affected by the disaster.

Medvedev explained that aid will be distributed according to the area occupied by each family in the 10 collapsed floors, located in an area between blocks six and seven of the building, where 39 people died.

Mutko pointed out the price to be offered to the victims will be acceptable and stressed that in Magnitogorsk are actively constructed real estate so, he said, there are new capacities in the market.

Boris Dubrobvsky, provincial governor of Chelyabinsk, said victims will be able to obtain new or used housing, and considered the amount allocated for these purposes by the federal executive to be sufficient.

The Chelyabinsk government had previously announced that it would pay 93 million rubles (1.347.000 million dollars) in compensation to deceased family members after the December 31st catastrophe.

Medvedev announced last Saturday that the federal cabinet would grant 65 million rubles (about 942,000 dollars) for the deceased's relatives and others affected by the tragedy.

A domestic gas explosion in the second floor of a Magnitogorsk building caused the collapse.

Some 1,000 specialists from the Ministry of Emergency Situations worked five days, saving 19 people's lives, including a child under 10 months of age who is recovering satisfactorily in a hospital in the capital


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