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Nearby star explosion equaled detonation of 100 million suns

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Staff writer ▼ | April 28, 2016
A giant star that exploded 30 million years ago in a galaxy near Earth had a radius prior to going supernova that was 200 times larger than our sun.
Supernova 2013ej
Space science   The sudden blast at a speed of 10,000 kilometers a second
This is according to astrophysicists at Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

The sudden blast hurled material outward from the star at a speed of 10,000 kilometers a second. That's equivalent to 36 million kilometers an hour or 22.4 million miles an hour, said SMU physicist Govinda Dhungana, lead author on the new analysis, Margaret Allen writes.

The comprehensive analysis of the exploding star's light curve and color spectrum have revealed new information about the existence and sudden death of supernovae in general, many aspects of which have long baffled scientists.

"There are so many characteristics we can derive from the early data," Dhungana said. "This was a big massive star, burning tremendous fuel. When it finally reached a point its core couldn't support the gravitational pull inward, suddenly it collapsed and then exploded."

The massive explosion was one of the closest to Earth in recent years, visible as a point of light in the night sky starting July 24, 2013, said Robert Kehoe, SMU physics professor, who leads SMU's astrophysics team.

The explosion, termed by astronomers Supernova 2013ej, in a galaxy near our Milky Way was equal in energy output to the simultaneous detonation of 100 million of the Earth's suns.

The star was one of billions in the spiral galaxy M74 in the constellation Pisces.

Considered close by supernova standards, SN 2013ej was in fact so far away that light from the explosion took 30 million years to reach Earth. At that distance, even such a large explosion was only visible by telescopes.


 

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