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Can't pick a tie, man? Well, you don't see it

Staff writer ▼ | February 10, 2013
If you ever wondered why men have hard time pairing clothes or can't tastefully decorate a house, and women are perfectly capable of doing that, the answer is simple: the sexes see differently.
Men women vision
Men women visionIf you ever wondered why men have hard time pairing clothes or can't tastefully decorate a house, and women are perfectly capable of doing that, the answer is simple: the sexes see differently.


Every sex has its advantages (and disadvantages): women are better in spotting fine differences between colours and men are better at keeping an eye on objects that move rapidly. Those are results of study conducted by Israel Abramov and colleagues at the City University of New York after testing the sight of students and staff.

Scientist found that men tended to find it more difficult to make fine distinctions between colours in the middle of the visual spectrum, such as between greeny-blues, and they see colors slightly differently then women.

Across most of the visible spectrum men require a slightly longer wavelength than do females to experience the same hue. In other words, a man see a turquoise vase being a little more blue than a woman who was looking at the same vase. At the time of the study Mr. Abramov said scientists have no idea about how sex influenced colour perception, but the reason could be differences in testosterone levels.

And that makes sense: the study also shows that men are better at spotting fine detail and rapidly moving objects. Biologically speaking, men have 25 percent more neurons in the visual cortex of the brain than women even before birth. The possible answer then could be our history, the the result of men and women performing different tasks for thousands of years.

Indeed, for a man to be a successful hunter it's an advantage if his vision is good at spotting and keeping an eye on distant animals. On the other hand, for a woman that search for edible plants it was more important to have the ability to finely discriminate forage foods at a close distance.

As is the case with all science theories, this one has its opponents too. John Barbur, professor of optics and visual science at City University, London, doesn't agree with the findings on colour differences. He said that many more men than women had congenital defects that caused imperfect colour vision: 8 percent compared to 0.5 percent and adds that among those who don’t exhibit loss of colour vision, men tend to have better colour vision than women.

So, no matter which theory you like more, and the end one advice stands true: men, go and fix those plumbings and let your women pick you a tie. That will bring a satisfaction to both sides.


 

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