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Final blow to anti-vaxxers is study on 650,000 kids that shows no link between vaccine and autism

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Staff Writer | Tuesday March 5, 2019 4:06AM ET
vaccine
Medicine   A massive new study from Denmark involved 657,461 Danish children

A massive new study from Denmark found no association between being vaccinated against measles, mumps, and rubella and developing autism.


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This study involving 657,461 Danish children born between 1999 and 2010 should bolster the argument that doctors and public health professionals still find themselves forced to make in the face of entrenched and growing resistance to vaccination.

The work, published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, was conducted by researchers at the Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen.

One of the researchers in the most recent study, Anders Hviid, said: "The idea that vaccines cause autism is still going around. And the anti-vaxx movement, if anything, has perhaps only grown stronger over the last 15 years."

The study's conclusion was similarly matter of fact.

"The study strongly supports that MMR vaccination does not increase the risk for autism, does not trigger autism in susceptible children, and is not associated with clustering of autism cases after vaccination," it said.

"It adds to previous studies through significant additional statistical power and by addressing hypotheses of susceptible subgroups and clustering of cases."

During 5 025 754 person-years of follow-up, 6517 children were diagnosed with autism (incidence rate, 129.7 per 100,000 person-years).

Comparing MMR-vaccinated with MMR-unvaccinated children yielded a fully adjusted autism hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.02).

Similarly, no increased risk for autism after MMR vaccination was consistently observed in subgroups of children defined according to sibling history of autism, autism risk factors (based on a disease risk score) or other childhood vaccinations, or during specified time periods after vaccination.

 

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