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Breast cancer: Decline in deaths in U.S.

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Staff Writer |
Breast cancer
Good news   According to the CDC report:

Breast cancer death rates among women decreased during 2010-2014, but racial differences persisted.

This is according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in this week’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

The findings show changes for death rates from breast cancer by age group for black and white women, the groups with the highest death rates in the United States.

“Our latest data suggest some improvement for black women when it comes to disparities,” said Lisa Richardson, director of CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control.

“First, the decline in deaths suggests that white and black women under 50 are benefiting equally from cancer treatments. Second, we’re hopeful the lack of difference in death rates between black and white women under 50 will start to be seen in older women.”

There was a faster decrease in breast cancer death rates for white women (1.9% per year) than black women (1.5% per year) between 2010 and 2014.

Among women under age 50, breast cancer death rates decreased at the same pace for black and white women.

The largest difference by race was among women ages 60–69 years: breast cancer death rates dropped 2.0 percent per year among white women, compared with 1.0 percent per year among black women.

The authors noted that the drop in death rates among women may be due to improved education about the importance of appropriate breast cancer screening and treatment, as well as women having access to personalized and cutting-edge treatment.


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