#stayhome Maintain the distance, wash your hands, and follow instructions from the health authorities.
RSS   Newsletter   Contact   Advertise with us

Are doctors discarding donor kidneys that could save lives?

Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn
Staff Writer | July 8, 2017
U.S. doctors are discarding donated kidneys that could keep people alive for years, simply because the organs are not top-quality, a new study claims.
Kidney donors
Organs   The organs are not top-quality
"Suboptimal" kidneys from older donors with health problems perform much better than expected, and would preserve a patient's life much longer than dialysis, said lead researcher Dr. Sumit Mohan, an assistant professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

About 73 percent of lower-quality kidneys received by Columbia patients were still functioning five years after transplant, Mohan and his colleagues found.

"To our surprise, yes, they did worse than the best-quality kidneys, but they didn't do that poorly," Mohan said.

By comparison, the five-year survival rate for kidney patients on dialysis is about 35 percent, Mohan said.

"If I don't get a kidney, my alternative is to stay on dialysis," Mohan said. "Even getting a suboptimal kidney provides a huge survival advantage."

Unfortunately, about 1 in 5 donated kidneys winds up in a trash can in the United States, Mohan said, even though the United Network for Organ Sharing shows more than 97,000 people are now on the waiting list for a kidney transplant.

These kidneys are discarded because biopsies of donated organs reveal scarring or other problems that make them less than ideal, Mohan said.


 

MORE INSIDE POST