RSS   Newsletter   Contact   Advertise with us

Subway takes chemical out of sandwich bread

Staff writer ▼ | February 6, 2014
Subway said it is removing a chemical used in yoga mats and shoe soles from the bread of it its popular sandwiches after a food blogger got more than 50,000 signatures in a petition drive.
Subway
SubwaySubway said it is removing a chemical used in yoga mats and shoe soles from the bread of it its popular sandwiches after a food blogger got more than 50,000 signatures in a petition drive.


"The complete conversion to have this product out of the bread will be done soon," Subway said in a statement. The company said the move had nothing to do with the protest and that it was "already in the process of removing azodicarbonamide as part of our bread improvement efforts," reports ABC News.

But Vani Hari, the activist blogger who takes credit for the removal of yellow dyes in at least three of Kraft's Mac & Cheese products for children, was declaring victory after she had been researching the company's bread ingredients since 2012.

"I commend Subway for finally responding to me and now over 57,000 concerned citizens. Their swift action is a testament to what power petitions and individuals who sign them can have. I'd like to note that current Subway sandwiches still have this ingredient, and urge everyone not to eat their sandwich bread until they have finally removed the chemical," Ms. Hari said.

Ms. Hari said she was shocked to find azodiacarbonamide, a plastic-based additive, on Subways' food labeling.

The World Health Organization has linked this chemical additive to respiratory issues, allergies and asthma, and it is banned in Europe and Australia. Azodiacarbonamide is legal in the United States and Canada.

"It helps... produce the air within the foam of a yoga mat. "It does the same thing for bread," said Ms. Hari.

Ms. Hari sent a petition via her Food Babe blog to Subway's corporate offices. The petition was signed by more than 50,000 people, asking that it be removed from the bread, as it is in products sold overseas. You can read the company story here on ABC News.


 

MORE INSIDE POST