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Schneiderman to GNC, Target, Walmart, and Walgreens: Stop selling unverified supplements

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Staff writer ▼ | February 3, 2015
Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman announced that his office sent letters to four major retailers for allegedly selling store brand herbal supplement products in New York that either could not be verified to contain the labeled substance, or which were found to contain ingredients not listed on the labels.
Ginseng
NY Attorney General   Just 21% of the test results passed DNA tests
The retailer with the poorest showing for DNA matching products listed on the label was Walmart.
The letters call GNC, Target, Walmart, and Walgreens to immediately stop the sale of certain popular products, including Echinacea, Ginseng, St. John's Wort, and others. Attorney General Schneiderman requested the companies provide detailed information relating to the production, processing and testing of herbal supplements sold at their stores, as well as set forth a thorough explanation of quality control measures in place.

The letters come as DNA testing, performed as part of an ongoing investigation by the Attorney General's Office, allegedly shows that, overall, just 21% of the test results from store brand herbal supplements verified DNA from the plants listed on the products' labels - with 79% coming up empty for DNA related to the labeled content or verifying contamination with other plant material.

The retailer with the poorest showing for DNA matching products listed on the label was Walmart. Only 4% of the Walmart products tested showed DNA from the plants listed on the products' labels.

“This investigation makes one thing abundantly clear: the old adage 'buyer beware' may be especially true for consumers of herbal supplements," said Attorney General Schneiderman.

"The DNA test results seem to confirm long-standing questions about the herbal supplement industry. Mislabeling, contamination, and false advertising are illegal. They also pose unacceptable risks to New York families—especially those with allergies to hidden ingredients.

"At the end of the day, American corporations must step up to the plate and ensure that their customers are getting what they pay for, especially when it involves promises of good health."


 

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