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North Carolina Pesticide Board announced several case settlements

Christian Fernsby ▼ | March 26, 2019
The N.C. Pesticide Board recently approved several settlement agreements.
North Carolina Pesticide Board
America   Settlements involved instances of pesticide drift, performing pesticide work
Settlements involved instances of pesticide drift, performing pesticide work with an expired license and selling restricted-use pesticides without a valid pesticide dealer’s license.

(Avery) Bill H. Daniels, public pesticide applicator for the Village of Sugar Mountain in Avery County, agreed to pay $1,400 for applying Gramaxone, a restricted-use pesticide that according to the label should not be used around home gardens, schools, recreational parks, golf courses or playgrounds in flower beds throughout a community and around town hall.

(Bladen) Jack Singletary, III, a private pesticide applicator from Tar Heel, agreed to pay $600 for drift damage from a pesticide application to a dicamba-resistant soybean field to an adjacent peanut field.

N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

(Brunswick) John E. McGee, a commercial pesticide applicator and owner of Lawn Doctor of Wilmington and Brunswick County, agreed to pay $1,000 for using pesticides in a manner inconsistent with its labeling. The company used pesticides labeled for agricultural use for ornamental and turf applications for residential customers.

(Davidson) James L. Leonard, a private pesticide applicator from Lexington, agreed to pay $500 for damage to his soybean field by the use of a pesticide inconsistent with its labeling.

(Guilford) Brian Crownover, regional manager for MWI Animal Health in Browns Summit, agreed to pay $1,400 for selling a restricted-use pesticide without a valid pesticide dealer license. A previous employee had held a dealer license but had left employment.

(Mitchell) Somong P. Miller, a private pesticide applicator from Bakersville, agreed to pay $500 for purchasing a fumigant without having the fumigation category on her private applicator certification at the time of purchase.

She also had no records of application including restricted-use pesticide records or a fumigant management plan.

(Richmond) Nathaniel D. Rankin of Ellerbe agreed to pay $600 for using a restricted-use pesticide with an expired pesticide license. Rankin has renewed his license.

(Wake) Matthew C. Parrish, a commercial pesticide applicator for SODCO Turf Producers in Willow Springs, agrees to pay $1,000 for drift damage from a pesticide application sprayed on a sod farm to an adjacent to a tobacco field.

N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

Wilson) Linwood Harding Scott III, a private pesticide applicator in Lucama, agreed to pay $1,000 for damage to a neighboring yard from drift from a pesticide application to a sweet potato field. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

Adam R. Doyle, an aerial pesticide applicator for Helicopter Applicators Inc. in Pennsylvania, agreed to pay $600 for depositing a pesticide within 100 feet of a residence. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.


 

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